"Every child deserves Great Parenting & every parent deserves the Joy that Great Parenting can bring."

 

Category Archives: Uncategorized

School’s Out

I think it was the end of 2nd grade, I remember the feeling on the last day of school, a euphoria, school was out!!! What freedom I felt! No more responsibilities, 3 months of lazy days, great weather, fun activities, sleeping a little bit later, getting to play outside, what a great feeling!

That feeling continued each year, regardless of my summer plans, even when I had various summer jobs and in college when I was going home for the summer. I did have responsibilities, but it was different. I didn’t have “the work” hanging over my head. Don’t get me wrong, I liked school, my friends, activities, and even some of the schoolwork, but the feeling of freedom from the school responsibilities was still wonderful.

As a parent of school-aged children, the end of the school year still held that euphoria. Less management of their activities, less structure to our days, more leeway in what we needed to accomplish, and more enjoyment of each other with fun activities.

At least that was the vision. The reality at times was being the referee to sibling squabbles, an urge to be the ultimate planner of everyone’s activities, and resistance from my children to follow the plan that I had made. All of that led to exhaustion.

The solution for me to get more enjoyment out of our summers was to shift from being the Family Brain, to a team leader of sorts. To realize that our family was just that, OURS, not just mine and to make it a smooth running, thriving team, it meant I needed to share some of the responsibility, recognize how capable my children were to solve their own problems (see The Joy of Boredom article for ways to do this), and train and encourage them to manage their own lives. The shift to that new positive family took a long time, however, it was worth every ounce of effort, minute, mile, and dollar. It was an investment in my children to allow them to grow, an investment in myself to know I was being the best parent I could be, and an investment in the future relationships I would have with my husband and children.

So, school’s out, are you looking for a summer of euphoria or are you anxious about extra free time and the difficulties it may cause? Take some time to start your shift to positive parenting that creates a loving family that works, grows, and enjoys together by taking a class. In the meantime, here are some extra tips to help immediately:

Give Your Child Everything He Wants (What!?)

Sometimes our children ask us for things that are unreasonable, inconvenient, against our good judgment, or just not possible. Rather than being annoyed, trying to explain and use logic, or even flat out saying “No”, give your child everything he wants in wishful thinking. This is a very powerful tool that can tremendously decrease tantrums, whining and power struggles.

Here are a few examples:

  1. When your child says “Take the baby back to the hospital” you can say “You wish you were still our only child in the house and we would only play and love you.”
  2. When your child wants a cookie before dinner you can say “I bet you wish you could finish the whole package of cookies right now.” You can also take one cookie, put it in a bag, and write his name on it.
  3. If your child is whining for chocolate milk, you could say “You sound like you wish you had a whole swimming pool of chocolate milk right now.”
  4. When your child wants to play a game and not do homework or chores you can say “Most kids wish they could play all day long and have no homework or chores.”
  5. When you are driving in the car and your child says he is thirsty, you can say  “Wouldn’t it be great if the back of the seat had a faucet that poured cold water out of it.” “What would you want to come out of the faucet, apple juice or milk?” or “Maybe we could have another spout that gave M&Ms.”

Many parents are very skeptical when hearing about this tool. Most of the time it takes them one try to see that it works. Wishful thinking works because it is fun, playful and empathetic (and not sarcastic or mean).

Make sure that you don’t talk after saying this one sentence. Just give your child what he wants in wishful thinking and continue your business, leave the room or just stay quiet.

What does it mean to feel valued?

A number of years ago I went for a checkup with my doctor. She was at a new practice and when I asked her why she switched from the old practice she told me that she hadn’t been happy there for a while. She was having trouble putting her finger on why and had a conversation with her sister to try to talk it through. Her sister asked:

  • whether she was having conflicts with the other doctors, staff or the patients?
  • had the work lost its luster for her?
  • was the job interfering with her family life?
  • The answer to all of those questions was no.

When the sister then asked, “Do you feel respected in the practice?” The doctor replied, “yes”. Then, “Do you feel valued?”. The doctor thought a moment and said, “That’s it! I’m just another good doctor that works here. I am not a part of things, I’m not asked about my opinion of where we are going or what we are doing as a practice. I don’t belong, I just follow instructions and that is not OK with me. I want to be important, I want my opinion to matter, I want to help improve the way we all work together.”

Don’t we all want to make a difference? To belong to the group? To have a say in things, a say that matters? I venture to say that your children (and partners) feel the same. We are social creatures living in a social world. That requires us to set a course, get along, create together, and be important. How are you valuing your family members today?

Here are some suggested ways to value the contributions made by the individuals in your family:

Express your appreciation

for who they are as well as for the things they do to help. Illustrate how it benefits the whole group. “Cleaning up all those toys in the family room made it a lot more comfortable for everyone when we watched the movie last night. Thanks.”

Ask for input and consider everyone’s opinion without judgment.

“So I hear 4 ideas for how to celebrate Grandma and Grandpa’s anniversary: Make them a special card, have a party, take them to dinner, make up a play and act it out for them.”

Take turns with chores

or picking out what’s for dinner, or deciding who gets which seat in the car and follow through with the choices. (Adults take a turn too).

Children will be a lot more flexible when they know that they get to make contributions too and that those contributions are valued.

Search

 

Recent Posts

 

Categories

 

Archives

 
Top
Schedule a 30 minute complimentary phone consultation to see if coaching is right for you. Book now.
pic_subscribe

Download "3 Ways to Restore Respect in Your Home" and get more free parenting tips